Anti-Slavery lectures to women and disturbed city authorities

There had evidently been something of a “riot” on March 2, when a lecture to an audience of women was disturbed by a “vile rabble”.  Here appears an account of a meeting the next day between Mr. Parkman, a Marshall sent by the Mayor, to meet with Mr. Graham , the lecturer. 

Graham is concerned that the Marshall was very “civil” toward the men who disturbed the meeting, but “uncivil” toward the women, who were asked to leave the hall.  The Mayor also appears, and he and the Marshall are insisting on knowing if Graham intends to repeat these lectures “only to women” in the city.

Graham intends to continue, indeed, is scheduled to do so on the next day.  The Marshall says they can “give no protection”.

Graham wonders if there is any longer a civil authority in the city.  The Mayor  says, “We certainly shall do all that we can to protect, you, sir, but what will that amount to?  What can a few constables do against an excited populace?  And suppose I should call out the militia, it would be impossible to make them act with any efficiency, while all their prejudices and sympathies are on  the side of the mob?”

A note indicates that the meeting did occur, without disturbance, but other lectures by Graham were disturbed.